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Posts Tagged ‘movies’

Hollywood loves to make a fuss when an actress known for her beauty deigns to take on a role that shows all of her imperfections.  Remember the gallons of ink spilled over Charlize Theron’s turn in Monster (nevermind that she was heavily made up in order to look “ugly” in that film)?  The angle for stories like these is that a glamorous woman’s decision to risk being seen as anything other than a flawless ideal of beauty is an act of heroism.  I encountered this same trope today while reading about Mariah Carey’s role in the new film Precious, and I’m so mad about it that I could just…wipe off my lip gloss and throw away my mascara. (more…)

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Yesterday, Professor Moss vented her ire at the atrocious new film, The Ugly Truth.  Since I barely endured the entire 90 minute movie without reenacting the final scene of Oedipus Rex, I’d like to add a bit more insult to injury here: (more…)

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It’s tempting to dismiss movies like I Love You, Beth Cooper as harmless.  After all, it’s getting mixed reviews from critics, and though it grossed $5 million in its first weekend, that only earned it 7th place, barely ahead of Pixar’s Up, which has been out for seven weeks (by comparison, Bruno earned $30 million in its first weekend).  It is not likely to become a huge box office hit, and nothing about it suggests a John Hughes-esque second life in its DVD/television release.  Yet I Love You, Beth Cooper‘s lack of success seems not due to its tasteless jokes or teen-comedy stereotypes (although we get those in abundance) but rather because it tries so to avoid being just another teen movie.  The movie fails because it seems to think it’s being innovative when in reality it is completely mundane. (more…)

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As far as I’m concerned, this video mash up is the best thing on the web right now:

And this post by creator Jonathan McIntosh beautifully lays out why Buffy is a better role model than Bella and Buffy the Vampire Slayer a much more feminist and empowering universe than Twlight. But it’s more complex than Buffy vs. Edward. For over a hundred years, vampires have been the archetype by which we explore taboo sexuality, especially female sexuality. Vampire attacks teach us what female sexuality is “really” like–when a woman is undead she is beyond the control of society and acts only to please herself.

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I recently rented Taken (2008), a generally serviceable thriller starring Liam Neeson as a retired CIA agent who goes to Paris to rescue his daughter, Kim, after she’s been snatched by white slavers. While the film itself isn’t bad, the gender politics are so reactionary they made me cringe.

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